SPRING NEWSLETTER – 2017

Presenting the 2017 Allergen of the Year…

The award for 2017 “Allergen of the Year” goes to alkyl glucosides, which are mild surfactants derived from natural sources such as coconut, palm or rapeseed oil, with glucose supplied by corn, wheat starch, or potatoes.  Alkyl gluocosides can be found in many skin care products, including shampoos and conditions, shower gels, sunscreen and moisturizers.

In a study of alkyl glucoside allergy, researchers at McGill identified that the average patient with this allergy is a female age 48 years, and the rash occurs commonly on the head and the hands. In an article in Dermatology News magazine (4/2017), Dr. Belsito of Columbia University was quoted as saying, “The allergen of the year is really chosen to educate dermatologists……it doesn’t mean they are these horrible substances that are damaging the world necessarily.”

The only way to diagnose skin allergic rashes (also known as Allergic Contact Dermatitis) is through Patch Testing. Patch Testing is an office procedure where a series of stickers containing various chemicals, are placed on your back for 48 hours straight. After that time, the doctor removes the stickers and looks at the skin for signs of allergy: redness, bumps, swelling.

For more info about Patch Testing, please call the office at (212) 249-8118.

Stratacell for Radiated Skin

At the recent American Society For Laser Medicine & Surgery meeting a hot topic was trying to decrease sensitivity in the skin from radiation treatments. In addition to Photobiomodulation ( LED specific treatment), a new topical called Strataderm can be used.

Strataderm is semi-occlusive film forming wound dressing that allows the skin to breathe and remain hydrated. Strataderm forms a durable, flexible and waterproof sheet. It does not penetrate into the epidermis or dermis. Strataderm restores the barrier function of the stratum corneum and reduces Trans-Epidermal Water Loss. The protected environment helps to normalize the level of collagen production while patients are healing from their radiation treatments.

It’s good to apply after and in between treatments. As always- check with your radiation oncologist.

Welcoming the Spring

Even though Spring is here, temperatures are still fluctuating and it’s cold outside. Check out this article about weather changes. Since you will be spending more time outdoors, just a friendly reminder to use sun protection.

Dr. Madfes on “Behind the Scenes” with James Earl Jones

Dr. Madfes was featured on “Behind the Scenes” with James Earl Jones! Check out the video below:

Getting through the winter with rosacea

The cold weather outside is not your friend, if you are one of the 16 million Americans with rosacea. Cold and gusty winds trigger rosacea flares, leading to red chapped cheeks, sensitive facial skin, and even bumps. On the other hand, those seeking shelter indoors also face equally troubling circumstances, as oveheated rooms and dry air can also prompt flares. Here are some tips for getting through the winter months with rosacea:

  1. Avoid wind by wearing a scarf or ski mask to cover your face.
  2. Avoid extremes of temperature by dressing in layers.
  3. Moisturize.  When facial skin gets dry, rosacea sets it. Never underestimate the importance of proper moisturizing. Looks for products with glycerin, ceramides, and hyaluronic acid.
  4. Don’t forget that the sun is a major rosacea trigger! Wear a broad spectrum sunscreen year round. We like Skinmedica Total Defense and Repair and EltaMD Facial UV 46.

All Natural Hair Loss Treatment

We are pleased to offer PRP Injections for Hair Loss.  PRP is a perfect, all natural procedure for anyone looking for thicker, healthier hair.

prp-22-ml-google_060216

PRP stands for platelet-rich plasma.  Platelets are the cells that help you stop bleeding when you scrape or cut yourself, but they are also rich in many growth factors, including: platelet-derived growth factor, transforming growth factor, and vascular endothelial growth factor.

Since platelets release many important factors, they have been used to treat joint problems, and now hair loss as well.  PRP has been shown to benefit patients with a variety of hair loss sub-types, including androgenic alopecia (also known as “male” or “female” pattern hair loss).

The best part about PRP is that it is all-natural, as it comes from your own blood.

PRP promotes hair growth via 2 pathways:

  1. encouraging new blood vessels (angiogenesis)
  2. encouraging hair follicles to enter and extend the duration of the anagen phase (the growth phase)

hair1

Studies show that PRP injections may even be as effective, if not more effective, than Rogaine (minoxidil 5%) at stimulating hair regrowth, in certain types of hair loss (El Taieb et al, 2016).

After we draw blood into a tube, it is spun in a centrifuge machine, and the platelets can be removed.

after drawing your blood, the sample is spun in a centrifuge machine, causing the platelets to collect at the top (yellow) and rest of blood to sink to the bottom (red)

after drawing your blood, the sample if spun in a centrifuge machine, causing the platelets to collect at the top (yellow) and rest of blood to sink to the bottom (red)

In our office we follow a protocol that consists of 4 monthly visits, and then maintenance.

Because it is all natural, there are no concerns about side effects with PRP.  Just make sure to stop any vitamins, fish oil, or pain relievers 1 week before, as they can cause bruising.

To schedule your PRP treatment, call (212) 249-8118.

Now offering Comprehensive Patch Testing

What is patch testing?

Patch testing is a method used to detect whether you are allergic to a specific substance or substances by contact.  Clues that you have allergic contact dermatitis include eczema-like rashes that don’t go away, itching on the face and/or eyelids, or reactions to products. We are looking for things that you may have been exposed to such as fragrance, preservative in cosmetics, metal from jewelry, and other chemicals in household items, that may be causing skin problems. Patch testing has nothing to do with allergies to ingested substances, i.e. food or medication; it is solely for skin-based allergies.

How does patch testing work?

Because we are looking for allergies via contact exposure, the test is done by placing a panel of 80 allergen on stickers onto your back and observing for any skin reactions over the following 2-5 days.

What is the procedure for patch testing?

Day 1: Patches are placed on clear skin on your back and worn continuously.

Day 3: Patches are removed in the office. The doctor checks for skin reactions and interprets the findings. Reactions are graded based on severity, and not all skin changes connote an allergy. The doctor will interpret the findings carefully.

Day 5-6: Third office to detect any delayed reactions.  Some substances only cause allergic reactions after several days.

Why is patch testing important?

Many patients report extreme difficulty managing their chronic skin irritation, and are not sure whether they are causing contact dermatitis by using their everyday products, be it cosmetics, perfumes, nailpolish, household products, even jewelry. Many cosmetic products contain dozens of chemicals, many of which are known allergens.  To learn more about allergic contact dermatitis click here.

For more information please call 212-249-8118.

Skin Cancer Take A Hike!

Patagonia here I come

Patagonia here I come

You may have heard that one in five Americans will develop skin cancer. But did you know that when caught early, skin cancer has a 98% cure rate! That’s why raising awareness about skin cancer prevention and detection is so important to the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) and its members. It’s also why I’m participating in the SKIN CANCER TAKE A HIKE event.

Please support my efforts: http://events.aad.org/goto/diane

Your donation to my hike will help the AAD:

  • provide free skin cancer screenings for more people across the country,
  • offer free resources to help teach kids and others how to protect their skin,
  • build permanent shade for outdoor community and play areas, and more.

Your donation will help save lives! Our goal is a world without skin cancer…and we need your help to get there.

 

 

 

Good luck to all the NYC marathoners… 3 tips for you!

girls-women-happy-sexy-53364

Good luck to all of our patients and friends who are running in the TCS NYC Marathon on November 6th.  We are rooting for you!

An estimated 20% of people will develop skin cancer at some point in their lives.  Studies show that marathoners have a higher exposure levels to ultraviolet radiation and pollution, all of which contribute to skin aging, brown spots, and skin cancer.  Protect yourself!  Here are some steps that you can take to protect yourself on the big day:

1) Look for a sunscreen that has SPF 30 or higher, is water resistant, and offers broad-spectrum (UVA/UVB) protection.  Both UVA and UVB are implicated in skin cancer.  Dr. Madfes and Dr. Williams both highly recommend the ELTA brand because their line of sunscreens are often also very moisturizing.  Dr. Williams recommends that patients layer a lotion first, and then use a spray for touch ups every 2 hours. Coppertone Sport spray and Coppertone Sport face stick are 2 other favorites.

2) For your face, try a brush on powder sunscreen for a second layer of protection and to set the sunscreen. We like this product from BrushOnBlock and this one from Colorscience.

3) Never underestimate the power of physical blocks via clothing, shades, and garments.

We hope you find these tops helpful.  Check out 26 more awesomely helpful tips brought to you by Runner’s World.